Tag Archives: apocalyptic

Book Review: A Billion Days of Earth, Doris Piserchia (1976)

4.25/5 (Very Good)

Doris Piserchia’s A Billion Days of Earth (1976) is a whimsical, disturbing, and stunningly inventive science fiction novel.  This is the second and by far the best of her novels I’ve read (A Billion Days of Earth surpasses Doomtime (1981) in virtually every regard).  Not only are the characters better drawn but the plot isn’t as easily derailed by repetitious actions.  That said, she isn’t always the best at plotting but her imaginative worldscapes and bizarre creatures more than compensate.   Continue reading Book Review: A Billion Days of Earth, Doris Piserchia (1976)

(mini) Film Ruminations: The Tree of Life (2011), Super 8 (2011), A Serious Man (2010), etc.

I do not write reviews for the majority of films I watch.  My reasons are somewhat nebulous considering it’s the summer and I certainly have time.  I see my blog more as a way to re-examine and bring to the forefront sci-fi books and films generally more esoteric and infrequently reviewed.  But certain winds shift direction for brief windows of time.  So here we go, a rundown of the more popular films I’ve seen in theater or re-watched recently.

The Tree of Life (2011), dir. Terrence Malick, rating 7.75/10 (Good)

tree_of_life_poster-xlarge

Terrence Malick’s The Tree of Life (2011) juxtaposes extensive sequences Continue reading (mini) Film Ruminations: The Tree of Life (2011), Super 8 (2011), A Serious Man (2010), etc.

Book Review: Vault of the Ages, Poul Anderson (1952)

3.75/5 (Good)

Vault of the Ages (1952), one of Poul Anderson’s earliest novels, should not be missed.  Although Vault of the Ages is at its core a simplistic juvenile (50s sci-fi for younger readers), Anderson’s budding storytelling skills make it engaging and a joy to read.  If only I had read it when I was younger!  Suggested for any fans of 50s sci-fi, early post-apocalyptical Continue reading Book Review: Vault of the Ages, Poul Anderson (1952)

Update: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. V

I promised not to buy any more books over the summer unless I ran out — alas, Memorial Day Sale at one of the best Half Price Books in the country (Austin) is a “bad” combination.  I had to reduce my gigantic pile by half before I dared approach the buy counter….

I’m proud of this haul!

1. Hawksbill Station (1968), Robert Silverberg (MY REVIEW)

I’ve wanted to procure Hawksbill Station for quite a while — the premise is fantastic, five dangerous prisoners are held at Hawksbill Station located in the Cambrian era… One bizarre use of time travel!  I hope Silverberg is at his best à la The World Inside and Downward to the Earth.

2. Master of Life and Death, Robert Continue reading Update: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. V

Update: Sci-fi about the social ramifications of overpopulation, a call for suggestions

    

I need reading suggestions.

After reading John Brunner’s Hugo winning masterpiece Stand on Zanzibar (1968) a few years back I became entranced by science fiction exploring social themes (intelligently) extrapolated from a future Earth condition of extreme overpopulation.  In the recent months I’ve read and reviewed a glut of similarly themed works of uneven quality.  Many of these works were inspired by Paul and Anne Ehrlich’s non-fiction The Population Bomb (1968) which warned of the mass starvation of humans in the 1970s and 1980s as a result of overpopulation. Continue reading Update: Sci-fi about the social ramifications of overpopulation, a call for suggestions

Science Fiction Inspired Song: Hawkwind’s ‘Damnation Alley’ (1977)

Hawkwind’s ‘Damnation Alley’ from the album Quark, Strangeness and Charm (1977) was inspired by Roger Zelazny’s novel Damnation Alley (1967) — which chronicles a suicidal voyage (in an armored vehicle) across post-apocalyptic America Continue reading Science Fiction Inspired Song: Hawkwind’s ‘Damnation Alley’ (1977)

Update: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. I

Oh the joys of amazon gift cards… And perusing dusty corners of local bookstores.

Here are my latest acquisitions.

1. Robert Silverberg’s World Inside (1971) (MY REVIEW HERE)

I’ve always enjoyed semi-dystopic works about the social ramifications of overpopulation (John Brunner’s Stand on Zanzibar is my all time favorite sci-fi novel).  I wonder if Silverberg was inspired by Brunner’s work.  I’ve yet to read a Silverberg novel and I’ve read that this is a pretty good effort.  So, those factors contributed to my purchase.

2. Doris Piserchia’s Continue reading Update: Recent Science Fiction Acquisitions N. I